(Source: silkelectrics, via 80s-90s-stuff)

692

asylum-art:

Karina Eibatova  aka Ei Ka Illustrations

Artist onTumblr | on Behance | Facebook |Flickr

"I am so in love with the Universe, you can see it in my other works as well. I wish I will draw for NASA onу day. Please, help my dream come true, share or like this project."

(via visceral-surreality)

1195

oldschoolfrp:

"The Great Red Dragon" depicts Flame, an ancient dragon whose vast treasure lures tasty adventurers to his lair.  (Keith Parkinson, from Kingsgate-The Art of Keith Parkinson, SQP/Fanfare, 2004; originally used on the cover of Dungeon magazine No. 1, TSR, 1986, illustrating Grant and David Boucher’s adventure “Into the Fire”.) 

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(via constellation-funk)

190

80s-90s-stuff:

90s videogames - Double Dragon 3, Sega Genesis cover artwork

227

(Source: the-decadent-uzbek, via keyframedaily)

642

thecomicsvault:

FANTASTIC FOUR #199 (Oct. 1999)
Art by Keith Pollard (pencils), Joe Sinnott (inks) & Janice Cohen (colors)
Words by Marv Wolfman

(via megatrip)

316

foxesinbreeches:

Polaroid by Carlo Mollino displayed inside a metal tube for the exposition Mollino Fragments, Triennale de Milan, 2005

(via grigiabot)

89

asylum-art:

Patterns of Light by Chris Wood

Cambridgeshire-based artist Chris Wood's beautiful, geometric arrangements of colorful glass create dazzling reflections and projections of light.

(via visceral-surreality)

2344

shojo-manga-no-memory:

Leiji Matsumoto

(via tsun-zaku)

490

miss-catastrofes-naturales:

Melih Dönmezer

1965

(via tutshii)

280

boomerstarkiller67:

Ulysses - art by Georges Pichard (1974)

(via greatgrottu)

45

"I never intentionally make ambiguous that which should be clear. Certainly, my understanding of film is that the story is an element of film, but it’s very much about portraying a reality, a world that exists beyond the screen. I think you would have to agree that our encounters with reality can sometimes be clear and unambiguous, but more often they are confoundingly complex, and the meaning of events that unfold before us can often elude comprehension forever. So, when I make my films, I am not the all-seeing, omniscient God explaining to you in the audience what has happened and why. You should just think of my movies as a string of scenes of pondering what I would do and how I would face these events unfolding before my eyes. The reality that I find incomprehensible and confounding, I present it exactly to you how I encounter it myself. That’s the approach I take to moviemaking." — Kiyoshi Kurosawa

(Source: strangewood, via perfectframes)

233